COWGIRL Magazine honors women of Texas A&M AgriLife

Susan Himes, Texas AgriLIfe Today

December 12, 2023

Five “women to watch” in the western industry, as recognized by COWGIRL Magazine, have ties to Texas A&M AgriLife.

The COWGIRL 30 Under 30 list recognizes women under the age of 30 who are rising stars and leaders in their industry. All the women will be formally honored the weekend of March 8 at the Wrangler Cowgirl 30 Under 30 Empowered Gala in Fort Worth.

Among the honorees are two former students from the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications, ALEC, in the Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Hannah Crandall sits on a staircase. She weara camel colored balzer and beige cowboy hat.
Hannah Crandall ‘21, North Texas Fair and Rodeo marketing and media manager, Denton. (Photo courtesy Hannah Crandall)

Honorees also include a holder of a Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications Graduate Certificate in Leadership Education, Theory and Practice, a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agent and a Texas A&M equine lecturer and horse-judging coach.

Honorees

These COWGIRL Magazine Class of 2024 members shared what being recognized means to them and their passion and dedication to the western and agricultural communities.

– Hannah Crandall ‘21, North Texas Fair and Rodeo marketing and media manager, Denton. Crandall majored in agricultural communication and journalism.

“The cowgirls that have been selected for this list are ladies that I look up to and who have paved the way for future generations. To be named one of them is such an honor, and I am forever grateful for the opportunity to network with these amazing women and continue sharing stories of what makes the western lifestyle and agriculture so unique and so necessary.  I credit so much of my success to my education as an Aggie, the supportive faculty and staff and the inspiring friends I made during my time in College Station.”

Cowgirl Madison Brooks wears a cream sweater, wild rag neckerchief and tan cowboy hat. She smiles at the camera
Madison Brooks ‘19, Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo business and corporate development manager, Houston. (Photo courtesy Madison Brooks)

– Madison Brooks ‘19, Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo business and corporate development manager, Houston. Brooks majored in agricultural communication and journalism.

“I’m so grateful to be an honoree. What a privilege to stand alongside such powerful, passionate women who represent the industry that I love so much.“

– Tyler Schuster, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association manager of leadership and development, Fort Worth. In May 2022, Schuster earned a graduate certificate in leadership education, theory and practice from Texas A&M.

Cowgirl Tyler Schuster stands with arms crossed smiling atthe camera. She wears a black cowboy hot and fuschia blazer.
Tyler Schuster, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association manager of leadership and development, Fort Worth. (Photo courtesy Tyler Schuster)

“To be able to represent rural Texas and women in agriculture is truly an honor. I am thankful for my time in Texas 4-H and the role it has played in my current career. Showcasing my love for agriculture is truly a passion, and I am blessed to get to live out this passion every day. I am so honored to be part of the 2024 Cowgirl 30 Under 30 class.”

– Kelley Ranly ‘20, AgriLife Extension 4-H and youth development specialist, Bryan-College Station. Ranly earned her bachelor’s in animal science in 2020 and her master’s in agribusiness in 2021, both from Texas A&M.

Kelly Ranly poses next to a white horse. The cowgirl has long blonde hair and wears an animal print neckerchief.
Kelley Ranly ‘20, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service 4-H and youth development specialist, Bryan-College Station. (Photo courtesy Kelley Ranly)

“I have been fortunate to meet so many wonderful people through my involvement in the agricultural industry. From completing my undergraduate and graduate degrees at Texas A&M to now having been employed by AgriLife Extension for the last six years, the university is a huge part of my story, and I am so thankful for their support.

“I really appreciate COWGIRL Magazine for taking the time to identify and recognize young women each year who are truly passionate about the western industry, and I look forward to continuing to expand my network through this incredible opportunity.”

Sarah Schobert in a professional portrait, She wears a white blazer, blue shirt and green turqouise necklace.
Sarah Schobert, Texas A&M Department of Animal Science equine lecturer and horse judging coach, Bryan-College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo)

– Sarah Schobert, Texas A&M Department of Animal Science equine lecturer and horse judging coach, Bryan-College Station. Schobert led the Texas A&M horse judging team to the 2023 national championship at the American Quarter Horse Association, AQHA, World Championship Show Collegiate Horse Judging Contest.

“I feel very blessed to have been touched and influenced by so many wonderful mentors, trainers, coaches and horsemen over the years. Every day I hope to influence the young people I come in contact with, and to give them the same exceptional experiences I received during my youth, collegiate studies and professional career.

“I always remind myself of where I started and how much I did not know. Without people helping me, I would not have ever had the opportunities I have been given. It is a daily challenge to be like the mentors who have helped me. I’m thankful to have received the COWGIRL 30 Under 30 recognition, but none of it would be possible without the countless mentors in my life, who have always been a lifting hand and pushed me to level up.”

-30-

Southern Livestock

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