Reproduction

Use heifer pre-breeding exams as a culling tool and to prepare for breeding season

STOCKTON, Mo. – “As cattle producers rebuild their cattle herds, the focus may be to retain heifers as replacements,” says Patrick Davis, University of Missouri Extension livestock field specialist. Breeding season will soon be upon us, and it is important to retain heifers that are good breeding prospects. Therefore, Davis ...

Chasing the elusive second calf

Getting first time mother cows bred for the second time is probably one of the strongest challenges for most beef producers. It can be extremely frustrating at the time of pregnancy diagnosis to find a high percentage of those young cows, the future of the cowherd, to be open. More ...

Calf health following calving

While calving season is oftentimes the most exciting time of the year for producers, it can have a dark side when sickness and death occur. Ensuring cows are in an adequate nutritional status (body condition score of 5 or 6) and not overfed can help reduce concerns of dystocia, as ...

Managing and developing young beef bulls

There are as many ways to feed and develop young beef bulls as there are seedstock producers. There are many and varied reasons that bulls are managed and fed the way they are. Whether bulls are developed on the ranch, in a commercial facility, or at a central bull test, ...

Keys to a prosperous start for newborn calves

A main economic driver of a cow-calf operation is the number of calves weaned per cow exposed. Two subsequent drivers are weight and phenotype. For these reasons, outstanding calf health is a directly correlated variable to calf growth and performance, and—ideally—profitability.  Prenatal cow care for calf success Sound calf health ...

Weaning weight versus reproductive efficiency

Economic analysis of cow-calf operations shows a strong relationship between profitability and both percent calf crop weaned per exposed female and pounds weaned per exposed female. This “economic analysis” discussion often leads to a debate of what has more value to the profit potential of a commercial cow-calf operation that ...

Texas A&M begins construction on Animal Reproductive Biotechnology Center

Texas A&M AgriLife Research hosted leaders from across The Texas A&M University System in a groundbreaking ceremony of the new Animal Reproductive Biotechnology Center at Texas A&M-RELLIS, a 2,400-acre applied research campus in Bryan. The $13 million facility is a joint construction project of AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life ...

USDA grant supports study of melatonin use in pregnant cows grazing toxic fescue on calf growth

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — With support from a $300,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture grant, the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station is continuing research on the use of a common sleep aid for humans to improve weight gains of calves whose mothers grazed toxic fescue while pregnant.       Tall fescue is the most common ...

A&M Board of Regents approve Animal Reproductive Biotechnology Center construction

The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents approved construction of the new $13 million Animal Reproductive Biotechnology Center at their meeting on Aug. 16. Construction is expected to begin in September with substantial completion scheduled for January 2025.       This initiative is a joint effort among the Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life ...