Herd Health

Brian Vander Ley, associate professor in the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, works with Ginger, a Gir cow gene-edited with resistance to bovine viral diarrhea virus. Photo by Craig Chandler, University of Nebraska Communication and Marketing.

Gene-edited calf may reduce reliance on antimicrobials against cattle disease

Cattle worldwide face major health threats from a highly infectious viral disease that decades of vaccinations and other precautions have failed to contain. Federal, private-sector and Nebraska Husker scientists are collaborating on a new line of defense, by producing a gene-edited calf resistant to the virus. If follow-up research confirms its ...

Building a veterinarian recruitment toolbox for rural Texas

In communities throughout Texas, the veterinarian serves as the cog of livestock and animal care, yet many rural areas are experiencing a historical lack of veterinary service. A collaborative pilot effort between the Institute for Infectious Animal Diseases and the Texas A&M School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is underway to enhance recruitment ...

Part 2-The BVD Virus in cow/calf operations-How do I test for BVD Virus?

If a calf tests negative, then the dam can be assumed negative. “BVD” or “Bovine Viral Diarrhea” virus is one of the most common and costliest viruses affecting cow/calf herds and backgrounding operations. Control of the BVD virus is best accomplished through implementation of three equally important practices: 1) surveillance ...

Part 1: The BVD Virus in Cow/Calf Operations-What does it look like and where did it come from?

“BVD” or “Bovine Viral Diarrhea” virus is one of the most common and costliest viruses affecting cow/calf herds and backgrounding operations. Control of the BVD virus is best accomplished through implementation of three equally important practices: 1) surveillance testing to detect and remove infected cattle, 2) vaccination to increase herd ...

Best practices for vaccinating cattle, handling vaccines and caring for animal health equipment

Fall weaning and transportation can be a high-stress period for calves that may be transitioning from one operation to another. As animal care providers, it’s our job to take that into consideration and do all we can to reduce the stress load on these animals.       First, let’s think of the ...

Five reasons you need your veterinarian more than ever during a drought

During drought, beef producers might find a best friend in their local veterinarian, says University of Missouri Extension veterinary toxicologist Tim Evans.       “Although veterinarians always provide a valuable service to animal owners, their value to livestock producers becomes increasingly important during drought, high heat and limited forage availability,” says Evans. ...

Management of bull preputial injuries

Preputial injuries in bulls can cause considerable economic loss and significantly impact a producer's breeding plans. Understanding the severity of a prepuce injury is critical to the outcome of the condition.        Bulls with pendulous sheaths and polled breeds have a high incidence of preputial injuries. A significant relationship appears to ...

Cattle reproduction: effect of calving difficulty on reproductive performance

Fall calving season is upon us and what happens during this time can affect our breeding season results. Dystocia is the proper name given to when there are any problems during birth, i.e., calving. It can be associated with a plethora of reasons such as a calf that is larger ...
pinkeye

Pinkeye in cattle: Combating an expanded list of viruses and bacteria

Pinkeye is a well-known bacterial infection that cattle producers watch for each year. The number of cases often increase during the summer and into the fall. The bacterium Moraxella bovis is most associated with pinkeye infections. However, an Alabama Cooperative Extension System veterinarian said there are other viruses and bacteria that labs ...

Cattle plus extreme heat equals a bad combination

This summer’s extreme heat has been and continues to be brutal on cattle. When the temperature at night remains above 80 degrees, it’s really hard for cattle to cool down.       During an average year, August is the worst month for heat stress in cattle. But this year, high temperatures arrived ...